Terms

Terms

Words are used in everyday language. Terms are defined words usually as part of a controlled vocabulary called Authority Files in the library world. Words used in everyday language are called Natural Language. Words classed by everyday persons are called a Folksonomy Words classed by professionals are called a Classification. We call words arranged by subject experts who are not professional indexers or subject cataloguers, Personal Terms. These Personal Terms usually do not adhere to the strict discipline of a library professional or a linguist. Even so they often contain technical terminology used by professionals. As a result Personal terms offer a way of bridging the undisciplined effects of natural langauges amd the disciplined order of Terminology and Authority Files found in libraries and memory institutions. Personal Terms in isolation are simply Terms. They are made more useful if they have Definitions (Dictionaries); Explanations (Encyclopaedias); are linked with Titles of articles, books and other works; with the Partial Contents of these works and even the Full Contents. In SUMS, these 6 options become 6 levels of Knowledge, which begin with level 1. Terms. Needs for Terms vary tremendously. In everyday life, as we see from Google, a single search field brings success. In research, the situation is much more complex. If we go to the Library of Congress Authorities and type Philosophy we find 3065 headings each of which contain from a few to thousands of titles. There are 71 headings simply for Philosophy--Terminology. In everyday life a Dcitionary is simply a book on our shelf. In the Library of Congress there are 213 subject headings for Dictionary and Dictionaries. To address this range of complexities SUMS initially has a Look Up Mode with 3 Levels of Search: Basic, Intermediate ad Advanced. Applied to terms this leads to: 1. Terms Basic 1. Terms Intermediate 1. Terms Advanced. Look Up Mode is the first of 3 Modes of Search. In Study Mode and Research Mode, 1. Terms becomes 01. Names and Terms.
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