Terms

sah

sah
Cologne Sanskrit Dictionary:
1 sah 1 cl. 1. A1. (Dha1tup. xx , 22) {sahate} (Ved. and ep. also {-ti} and exceptionally {sAhati} , once in MBh. 1. sg. {sahyAmi} ; p. {sahat} {sahamAna} [q.v.] ; pf. {sche} , {sasAha} ; Ved. also {sasAhe} and{sAsAhat} ; {sAsahat} ; {sAsahISTAH} , {sAsahyAma}3{sAsahyAma} ; p. {sehAna} , {sAsahAna} , {sAsahvas} and {sAhvas} [q.v.] ; aor. {asAkSi} , {sAkSi} , {sAkSate} RV. ; {sAkSIt} GopBr. ; {sakSati} AV. ; {sakSat} , {sAkSAma} RV. ; Impv. {sakSi} , {sAkSva} ib. ; p. {sakSat} ib. ; {asahisTa} RV. ; Prec. {sahyAs} , {sAhyAma} ib. ; {sAkSIya}. AV. ; {sAhiSImahi} RV. ; fut. soDhA} MBh. &c. ; {sahitA} Gr. ; {sakSyati} MBh. , {-te} Br. ; {sAkSye} [?] AV. ; {-sahiSyati} , {-te} MBh. ; Cond. {asahisyat} ib. ; inf {sahadhyai} RV. Kath. ; {sADhyai} MaitrS. ; {soDhum} , {sahitum} MBh. ; ind. p. {soDhvA} ApSr. Sch. ; {sAdhvA} , {sahitvA} Gr. ; {sahya} RV. &c. ; {saham} Br.) to prevail , be victorious ; to overcome , vanquish , conquer , defeat (enemies) , gain , win (battles) RV. AV. Br. R. Bhatt. to offer violence to (acc.) to master , suppress , restrain to be able to or capable of (inf. or loc.) ib. to bear up against , resist , with. stand to bear , put up with , endure , suffer , tolerate (with {na} to grudge to be lenient towards , have patience with any one (gen.) to spare any one to let pass , approve anything (with {kalam} , {kala-kSepam} &c.) to bide or wait patiently for the right time Caus. or cl. 10. {sAhayati} (aor. {asISahat}) , to forbear Desid. of Caus. {sisAhayiSati} Desid. {sIkSate} (p. {sIkSat} ; accord. to Pa1n2. 8-3 , 61 , also {sisahiSa}) , to wish to overcome RV. TS.: Intens. {sAsaSyate} , {sAsoDhi} (cf {sAsahi} Gr. [Cf. {sahas} and for] 2 sah 2 (strong form {sAh}) mfn. bearing , enduring , overcoming (ifc. ; see {abhimAti-SAh} &c.) 3 sah 3 cl. 4. P. {sahyati} , to satisfy , delight Dhatup. xxvi , 20 ; to be pleased ib. ; to bear , endure (cf. 1. {sah}) ib.
 
......
Indian (Gujarat, Rajasthan): Hindu (Bania, Vania) and Jain name, from Gujarati sah ‘merchant’ (from Sanskrit sadhu ‘honest’, ‘good’). This name was originally Sah; it appears to have been altered under the influence of the Persian word for ‘king’
Back